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Every Doeg has it’s day

1 Samuel 22:11-13

Then the king sent to summon Ahimelech the priest, the son of Ahitub, and all his father’s house, the priests who were at Nob, and all of them came to the king. 12 And Saul said, “Hear now, son of Ahitub.” And he answered, “Here I am, my lord.” 13 And Saul said to him, “Why have you conspired against me, you and the son of Jesse, in that you have given him bread and a sword and have inquired of God for him, so that he has risen against me, to lie in wait, as at this day?”

In chapter 22, Saul confronts the priests and accuses them of conspiring against him and helping David.

1 Samuel 22:14-16

14 Then Ahimelech answered the king, “And who among all your servants is so faithful as David, who is the king’s son-in-law, and captain overyour bodyguard, and honored in your house? 15 Is today the first time that I have inquired of God for him? No! Let not the king impute anything to his servant or to all the house of my father, for your servant has known nothing of all this, much or little.” 16 And the king said, “You shall surely die, Ahimelech, you and all your father’s house.”

Ahimelech says, ‘its not my fault he said was on a secret mission’ and Saul says “too bad, I’m killing everyone here.”

1 Samuel 22:17-19

17 And the king said to the guard who stood about him, “Turn and kill the priests of the Lord, because their hand also is with David, and they knew that he fled and did not disclose it to me.” But the servants of the king would not put out their hand to strike the priests of theLord. 18 Then the king said to Doeg, “You turn and strike the priests.” And Doeg the Edomite turned and struck down the priests, and he killed on that day eighty-five persons who wore the linen ephod. 19 And Nob, the city of the priests, he put to the sword; both man and woman, child and infant, ox, donkey and sheep, he put to the sword.

So who is Doeg the Edomite? And what was Doeg doing at Nob in the sanctuary? We can only assume that he was there to worship.  The King storms in and says “what  happened here” and Doeg sees an opportunity, raises his hand and says, “I saw the whole thing.”

However, he’s not exactly an honest man… look back up at vs 9-10 (1 Samuel 22:9-10)

9 Then answered Doeg the Edomite, who stood by the servants of Saul, “I saw the son of Jesse coming to Nob, to Ahimelech the son of Ahitub, 10 and he inquired of the Lord for him and gave him provisions and gave him the sword of Goliath the Philistine.”

Doeg tells a half-truth —he says that the priest had done three things for David. First, he provided spiritual counsel. Second, the priest gave David provisions (the holy bread). Third, the priest gave David a weapon. All of this was most certainly aiding and abetting this fugitive from the King.

But, Doeg leaves out one vastly important detail. Doeg doesn’t bother to mention that the priest was told that David was on a mission for the king. Doeg doesn’t think this detail is important. And Doeg is not only willing to fuel the king’s anger with the priests, but when Saul’s men refuse to execute the priests for fear of the Lord, Doeg voluteers! And he not only kills the priests, but every man, woman, child, baby and animal in the town of Nob. It is a massacre.

David, who is also a poet and song writer and who wrote much of the book of Psalm, wrote Psalm 52 about Doeg. He says,

Why do you boast of evil, O mighty man? The steadfast love of God endures all the day.

Your tongue plots destruction, like a sharp razor, you worker of deceit.
You love evil more than good, and lying more than speaking what is right.
You love all words that devour, O deceitful tongue.

But God will break you down forever; he will snatch and tear you from your tent;
he will uproot you from the land of the living.

David said, “Doeg you might think you’re a big man now, but every Doeg has its day.”

Obviously, Doeg felt that a promotion from head shepherd to head executioner was a step up in the world, even if his promotion was prompted by his dishonesty. And David declares says, people like you love evil more than good and God will break you for it.

Ironically David lied in the presence of the priest as well…  but what is the difference? David’s lie only hurt his own credibility. But Doeg’s lie was at the expense of another.

You know, some people can only feel good about themselves by using destructive speech and by tearing others down. Doeg did it by spreading a half-truth about Ahimilech and then ingratiated himself to King Saul as some kind of “defender of the kingdom” by lying about Ahimilech and then destroying the entire town of Nob.

But truthfully, whether it’s a lie that hurts ourselves or others – the bottom line is, if we have to use deceit to promote ourselves we are not being the people God made us to be.

Lying is the work of an outlaw.

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David the Outlaw

We are looking at the life of David. And we’re going to be here for a long time every day if I have to recap where we’ve been, so let’s just say David was a shepherd, who was promised a princess if he killed a Giant. He killed the giant, but the King offered him a different princes. David became best friends with the Prince and the King promoted David to be a general over thousands of men.

David became a national hero – the people grew to love him… even more so than they loved their King. This made King Saul jealous and last week we read that

1 Samuel 18:10-11

“… while David was playing the harp,.. Saul had a spear in his hand and he hurled it, saying to himself, “I’ll pin David to the wall.” But David eluded him twice.”

So at the this part of the story, David’s wife Michal and David’s best friend Jonathan both help David escape the Kingdom.

1 Sam 19:11-12
Saul sent men to David’s house to watch it and to kill him in the morning. But Michal, David’s wife, warned him, “If you don’t run for your life tonight, tomorrow you’ll be killed.” So Michal let David down through a window, and he fled and escaped.

In fact she even went a step further and she put a marble statue in her bed and gave it some fake hair and tried to fake out Saul’s guards that David was asleep to buy him some more time.

Later in chapter twenty, David is hiding in the outskirt forests and Jonathan is helping him determine how serious Saul is on having him killed. Finally Jonathan returns and confirms that Saul is bent on killing David and the two say their goodbyes.

So in the next chapters what we find is David spends a large portion of his life – on the run and being an outlaw like robin hood.

Most of us are familiar with Robin Hood, the hero of legend, books, TV, and movies. He and his band of merry men wandered Sherwood Forest, playing cat and mouse with the Sheriff of Nottingham and the evil Prince John. Technically he was an outlaw, but he is more famous for “robbing from the rich, and giving to the poor.” Do you ever wonder how a thief qualifies as a hero? Is stealing OK when you steal from bad people and give it to good people? Robin Hood is one of those characters who walk a fine line between being a good guy and an outlaw.

But I think a lot of us walk that line. I don’t know anybody who is either totally evil, or absolutely good. I think most of us are a mixture. We have moments when we behave pretty well. But there are times when the outlaw peeks out and we cross the fine line between right and wrong.

The story of David s a story of a man in the Bible who walked that fine line like Robin Hood that you and I sometimes walk. The people of Israel probably saw him the way we see Robin Hood- “technically” he was an outlaw, but really a good guy. I think God put this story in the Bible to teach us something not just about David, but about ourselves.

How do you become more of a hero, and less of an outlaw?

1 Samuel 21 – David the Outlaw

Then David came to Nob to Ahimelech the priest. And Ahimelech came to meet David trembling and said to him, “Why are you alone, and no one with you?” 2 And David said to Ahimelech the priest, “The king has charged me with a matter and said to me, ‘Let no one know anything of the matter about which I send you, and with which I have charged you.’ I have made an appointment with the young men for such and such a place. 3 Now then, what do you have on hand? Give me five loaves of bread, or whatever is here.” 4 And the priest answered David, “I have no common bread on hand, but there is holy bread—if the young men have kept themselves from women.”

1. Lying to the Priest – David has left the royal courts so fast that he did not take anything with him, including food. So he travels to Nob, the city of priests, this is where 86 priests and their families lived. The writer tells us that when David approached Ahimelech the priest, he trembled. Ahimelech was obviously afraid and we can assume that he knew David was a fugitive. But he was also suspicious since David, a military officer, was traveling alone without an armed guard as was the custom. More so it was the Sabbath, which meant he shouldn’t have been traveling at all. How does David explain himself to the priest? He lies….

David tells Ahimelech that he is on a ‘secret mission for King Saul’ and that it’s on a ‘need to know basis.’ He said, “my men are waiting for me over …..there…. yea and we just need some food.

Ahimelech says the only food available is the holy bread – that is, bread which is dedicated to God, the same bread that sits on a table for seven days and then is eaten only by priests. Ahimelech gives David the bread and then David asks for a weapon.

Both great things to ask for when you run into a church… “quick I need food and weapons.” But for whatever reason the sword of Goliath is here and Ahimelech gives David the sword and David leaves.

Now, is David an outlaw because he eats the consecrated bread? No, even Jesus mentions this same story when uses it for his own defense. No, he’s an outlaw here because he’s lying to protect himself. I think if David had been honest with the priest, he would have received the same help… but it gets worse…

1 Samuel 21 v10-14

And David rose and fled that day from Saul and went to Achish the king of Gath. 11 And the servants of Achish said to him, “Is not this David the king of the land? Did they not sing to one another of him in dances, ‘Saul has struck down his thousands, and David his ten thousands’?” 12 And David took these words to heart and was much afraid of Achish the king of Gath. 13 So he changed his behavior before them and pretended to be insane in their hands and made marks on the doors of the gate and let his spittle run down his beard. 14 Then Achish said to his servants, “Behold, you see the man is mad.

2. Faking insanity – In fleeing from Saul, David decides that the best place to hide is in the territory of the Philistines. In essence, David hides among the enemies of God. Thinking he won’t be recognized he goes to the leader of the Philistines and offers his services. But newsflash – David is carrying the sword of Goliath, he’s in the city of Gath, the home town of Goliath, and he’s a fairly well known character around there.

Surprise – surprise – The Philistines do remember the guy that killed their cousin and they even know the song that was written about him: “Saul has killed his thousands, and David his tens of thousands.”

So David lies again. He starts blubbering saliva down his lips and onto his beard, babbling nonsensical words, and spreading graffiti all over the town gates. All of this was a sure sign to the people of that time that David was insane. The Gath King responds with a comical statement: “Am I so short of madmen that you have to bring this fellow here to carry on like this in front of me?”

So he sends David away since he has enough lunatics on his own staff.

 

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Parallels to Jesus – part 2

An so real quick I want to give you the elements of being a true friend, but at the same time relate this to Jesus, because we’ve been saying all through this that the story of David also mirrors the story of Christ.

So what are the elements of an authentic and faithful friend?

1. A true friend guards your heart

When you trust something deeply personal to another person, it’s not theirs to give away. An authentic friend knows this and values your privacy and guards your heart.

Matthew 11:28 Jesus says, Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

Jesus wants to be the friend who you unburden your life to, he wants to be the one who you speak to, complain to, vent to and grieve to. Don’t think that Jesus expects you to be perfect and holy and robotic in your prayers – Jesus is your authentic friend – be his.

2. A true friend validates your life.

Life wears on us, it’s true – and so having someone who can relate to – what you’ve been through and who lets you know you’re not alone is important.

In John 10:10 Jesus says, The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.

Jesus isn’t like the friends of this world, he isn’t trying to take from you or diminish you or consume you – rather Jesus wants to offer you an amazing life.

3. A true friend keeps their promise.

If a friend says they will support you in something or they promise to be in your corner, you can count on that to be true. Every time.

Paul said of his own experience with Christ in Philippians 1:6 I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ.

Jesus wants you to have this abundant life, and so you are not a side project that he begins and then forgets about, you are not his friend, only when things are going well – our Lord sticks to you like glue all the way to the end.

4. A true friend tells you the truth.

You can trust that a true friend will be honest with you, even when it’s hard or not exactly what you want to hear. A true friend would rather you succeed and thrive knowing the truth than flounder with fake compliments.

Jesus said in John 14:6 “I am the way, and the truth, and the life.” You have assurances that Jesus is the truth because God is the truth. In Him there is no falsehood. You can be confident that his word – these words of scripture – will prove true in your life – all through your life.

5. A true friend forgives your mistakes

Let’s face it, who hasn’t let someone you care about down or hurt them in some way? We all have. But there’s great comfort in knowing that a true friend will forgive you and always be in your corner.

2 Corinthians 5:17 says, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation.  The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

You have no past… you have no mistakes… you have no sins in the eyes of Christ. The Bible says yours sins were forgiven on the cross of Jesus before you were ever born. There is nothing you can do… no matter how bad a friend you are… to make Jesus love you any less.

6. A true friend shares your faith.

You know, the best friends of all – are the ones who understand and have the same love for God and trust in Christ that you have. They “get you” because they “get God.”

And as you look at this list, I hope you recognize the true friends in your life and perhaps another who calls us all friend, one who defines friendship in the best possible way:

Jesus says in John 15:15 No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.

The bottom line is: we need one another like David needed Jonathan, like Ruth needed Naomi, like Paul needed Timothy. And we must constantly be on guard against the busyness of life and the fear of intimacy so that our relationships can run deep.

You know, the core of Jonathan and David’s friendship was spiritual, their commitment to God. And if you are truly desiring a deeper walk with another person you must first start with a deeper walk with God.

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The Best Friend

Last week was our great battle of David and Goliath, arguably one of the greatest and most told stories in the Bible and certainly a turning point and a highlight in David’s life. What we’re going to see is that instantly – this skyrockets this young man’s life front and center. But as with any rise to fame and glory, it’s not all parades and die-hard fans. The road to David’s Kingship is going to be filed with dark times, assassination attempts, isolation and heartache.

And what are the main sources of pain in our lives? Other people. Right? Some people are like clouds, when they disappear it’s a brighter day. And so in our chapter today we’re going to take a look at the people in David’s life. Every life needs a little bit of tension, right? A little bit of drama, and nobody stirs up drama all by themselves, it takes two to tango and so here in 1 Samuel 18, we’re introduced to the other characters in David’s life.

The nemesis

The wife

The his best friend

3 people, 3 different relationships in David’s life – King Saul, David’s first wife Michael and David’s best friend Jonathan. And we’re going to follow that order so that we end with Jonathan. So let’s get right into it…

The Best Friend

The friendship between Jonathan and David is one of the most noble relationships in all the Bible. Its beginnings are described here in 1 Samuel 18 and it lasts their entire lives.

1 Samuel 18:1-5

As soon as he had finished speaking to Saul, the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul. 2 And Saul took him that day and would not let him return to his father’s house. 3 Then Jonathan made a covenant with David, because he loved him as his own soul.4 And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was on him and gave it to David, and his armor, and even his sword and his bow and his belt. 5 And David went out and was successful wherever Saul sent him, so that Saul set him over the men of war. And this was good in the sight of all the people and also in the sight of Saul’s servants.

You know it’s ironic that with the rise and popularity of facebook and social media and people bragging about how many “friends” and “connections” they have, we are actually losing our ability to have real close friends.

It’s true, in a survey conducted a few years back it was estimated that 25 years ago most people had 3 close friends. Now that number has slipped to 2. And those people who have no close friends, that number has tripled in the last 25 years.

So, who are your close friends? Or the more important question – who are you close friends to? I don’t have to tell you that research has said that having a close friend leads to better health and a longer life expectancy.

And don’t just think, well God made me this way. I’m better off alone, this is how I like it. You might think that way, but don’t blame it on God, he didn’t make you that way. Look at Adam and Eve again. Adam was the first arrival in Paradise and he had everything he could ever want. He was in perfect relation with God, he was without sin and he had everyone of his needs met. And yet.. the Bible says there was no suitable friend for him. In other words God was his companion, but it wasn’t enough.

You know we mentioned Saul earlier and jealousy, God has to be the least jealous being in all time and space. Because even though he was all things to Adam he knew he could never be all Adam would ever need and so he made Adam a friend. God willingly, un-jealously made Eve when Adam was alone.

Translation: God made us to need others besides himself.

Jonathan didn’t create drama in David’s life, in fact he protected David and did what he could to preserve David. So let’s look at two of Jonathan’s best qualities.

1. Jonathan was FAITHFUL

The biblical model of our relationships is a covenant. It’s a higher standard. Friendships cannot survive on mutual admiration, they require commitments. The Bible pictures David and Jonathan as making a conscious commitment to each other, a solemn compact, “a covenant.”

A relationship that says, I love you regardless, not I love you if….

Verse 4 demonstrates the faithfulness of Jonathan. “Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was on him and gave it to David, with his armor, including his sword and his bow and his belt.”

Remember, Saul is jealous of David, but Jonathan has the most to lose doesn’t he? – he would be next in line as the son of Saul and yet – he isn’t showing family loyalty or self preservation, Jonathan isn’t jealous of David – he is faithful to David.

You see, true friendship is about commitment rather than convenience. David and Jonathan are in a covenant relationship. And this is much different than the “consumer/provider” model that most relationships are in. In a covenant relationship THEIR needs come first. Consumer/provider says “you owe me” but covenant relationship says “I owe you.”

And I really believe this, the term “friendship” needs to be rescued from its all too casual use. True friends are rare and they have rights and responsibilities to each other; and it’s the model we need to model in our marriages, our families, and our churches.

2. Jonathan was Authentic (v18:1)

As soon as he had finished speaking to Saul, the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul.

Jonathan isn’t David’s friend to get something from him. He’s not riding his coat tales. His sister Michal is a fair weather friend, she’s only happy so long as the relationship benefits her, but here the Bible says that Jonathan is tied to the very soul of David.

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The Wife

Last week was our great battle of David and Goliath, arguably one of the greatest and most told stories in the Bible and certainly a turning point and a highlight in David’s life. What we’re going to see is that instantly – this skyrockets this young man’s life front and center. But as with any rise to fame and glory, it’s not all parades and die-hard fans. The road to David’s Kingship is going to be filed with dark times, assassination attempts, isolation and heartache.

And what are the main sources of pain in our lives? Other people. Right? Some people are like clouds, when they disappear it’s a brighter day. And so in our chapter today we’re going to take a look at the people in David’s life. Every life needs a little bit of tension, right? A little bit of drama, and nobody stirs up drama all by themselves, it takes two to tango and so here in 1 Samuel 18, we’re introduced to the other characters in David’s life.

The nemesis

The wife

The his best friend

3 people, 3 different relationships in David’s life – King Saul, David’s first wife Michael and David’s best friend Jonathan. And we’re going to follow that order so that we end with Jonathan. So let’s get right into it…

The Wife

David’s second relationship that causes drama in his life is with his first wife Michal

v17 Then Saul said to David, “Here is my elder daughter Merab. I will give her to you for a wife. Only be valiant for me and fight the Lord’s battles.” For Saul thought, “Let not my hand be against him, but let the hand of the Philistines be against him.” 18 And David said to Saul, “Who am I, and who are my relatives, my father’s clan in Israel, that I should be son-in-law to the king?” 19 But at the time when Merab, Saul’s daughter, should have been given to David, she was given to Adriel the Meholathite for a wife.

Wait what? Wasn’t David promised the first born daughter, but she was given to someone else. Well that was a bait and switch, so what do we know about Michal?

v20 Now Saul’s daughter Michal loved David. And they told Saul, and the thing pleased him.

What’s not to love, he’s young and handsome and he’s popular with the people. And so the first thing we know about Michal is that she loves her husband, but what do we know already going into this relationship? She wasn’t David’s first pick. And that is going to create some…. drama.

v21 Saul thought, “Let me give her to him, that she may be a snare for him and that the hand of the Philistines may be against him.” Therefore Saul said to David a second time,  “You shall now be my son-in-law.” Saul commanded his servants, “Speak to David in private and say, ‘Behold, the king has delight in you, and all his servants love you. Now then become the king’s son-in-law.’” 23 And Saul’s servants spoke those words in the ears of David. And David said, “Does it seem to you a little thing to become the king’s son-in-law, since I am a poor man and have no reputation?” 24 And the servants of Saul told him, “Thus and so did David speak.” 25 Then Saul said, “Thus shall you say to David, ‘The king desires no bride-price except a hundred foreskins of the Philistines, that he may be avenged of the king’s enemies.’” Now Saul thought to make David fall by the hand of the Philistines. 26 And when his servants told David these words, it pleased David well to be the king’s son-in-law.

Saul was not a man of honor, nor a man of his word. David had already “earned” the hand of the King’s daughter by slaying Goliath, but the king hoped that David would die in his efforts to win her hand a second time.

But did it work? … it did not.

… Before the time had expired, 27 David arose and went, along with his men, and killed two hundred of the Philistines. And David brought their foreskins, which were given in full number to the king, that he might become the king’s son-in-law. And Saul gave him his daughter Michal for a wife.

Listen, any man who has trembled in his boots going to his girlfriend’s Dad to ask her hand in marriage – doesn’t hold a candle to David. “Sure you can marry my daughter, I just need you to do one little thing….”

Yuck.

But the happy couple didn’t stay happy. And to tell Michal’s story and get at the heart of HER drama, we need to skip ahead in the story a few years. Many years later, when David was on the run from King Saul, he would be away from Michal for between ten and fourteen years. And it was during that time that he built for himself another life and that included another family.

As the war between Saul’s house and David’s house continued so did David’s family grow. He married wife after wife: Maacah the daughter of Talmai king of Geshur; Haggith; Abital; Eglah. And at this point he had six children by seven wives. But it was poor Michal who remained childless.  But the Bible says she was a good step Mother even though David was a poor Father.

Eventually David prevailed and began to reign over all Israel from Jerusalem. Israel spent much of his reign at war with Philistia (same people as Goliath). And so during one of these battles, David was in charge of a raid that had a mission to sneak in and steal the lost ark. (they made a movie about it)

And so after David and his men liberate it and bring it home it’s here that we have another story about Michal.

2 Samuel 6:16-20

As the ark of the Lord came into the city of David, Michal the daughter of Saul looked out of the window and saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord, and she despised him in her heart.

v20 And David returned to bless his household. But Michal the daughter of Saul came out to meet David and said, “How the king of Israel honored himself today, uncovering himself today before the eyes of his servants’ female servants, as one of the vulgar fellows shamelessly uncovers himself!”

Thirty thousand people gather to bring the ark to Jerusalem, everyone is singing and dancing and worshiping God, but Michal isn’t one of them. And I suspect she WASN’T exactly a humble woman.  In fact, three times in this passage how is she referred to as? “Daughter of Saul.” Not David’s wife… but the daughter of Saul. This is a proud woman who probably thinks very highly of herself and her position (much like her Father).

And just as a side note, IF you have a Nemesis, probably not a good life choice is to ask the question: “Hey, do you have a daughter?”

So, when David gets home – she lets him have it. She speaks to David (her husband) like a mother does to a naughty child.

And here is the thing about Michal – true – she used to love him, and when David left, he ignored her and forgot about her – he wasn’t a good husband. But… her claim to fame in the Bible is as being the wife who had a critical heart.

Criticism is another avenue where DRAMA sneaks into our lives. Condemnation, disapproval, gossip – these are all contributing factors to the Mamma Drama.

David is trying to worship God, he’s free, he’s uninhibited and here comes someone to tap him on the shoulder and say, “Uh, you’re doing it wrong.”

Jeremiah 17:9 says The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it?

How do you know if it’s creeping in to your life? Because a critical spirit is not difficult to recognize. Someone with a critical spirit is prone to complaining, seeing the glass as half-empty, lamenting about unmet expectations, predicting failure (typically in others more than in oneself), and being judgmental. People with critical spirits are no fun to be around.

Romans 14:10 Why do you pass judgment on your brother? Or you, why do you despise your brother?

What about at church? Have you ever been critical with something at a Church?

· Maybe something the pastor says in a sermon

· Maybe something in a prayer
· Or a song that was chosen
· Or a person’s behavior sitting near you

What do you do with those feelings? Or maybe it’s outside of Church. You just can’t believe how your co-workers act, or how your neighbors conduct themselves, what do you do?

So here are the rules of how to avoid a critical spirit:

1. Before you talk to them ask yourself WHY you have a concern, is it because you care about them? Is it because you want them to improve.. or …is it because you care about yourself?

You see, David wanted to bring glory to God, but Michal only cared that David was an embarrassment to her. And what does David say to her in return?

22 I will make myself yet more contemptible than this, and I will be abased in your eyes. But by the female servants of whom you have spoken, by them I shall be held in honor.”

David said, “Oh you think that’s bad, listen Missy (I’m paraphrasing) I’ll become even more undignified than this. And you’ll hate it, but the people who worship God like I do… they’ll get it, because they love God the way I love God.”

Michael didn’t criticize David because she cared about him or his welfare, she was only concerned about herself. Before you say something, check your motivation, and the second thing is this… and it’s very important….

2. Talk to THEM… not your neighbors… about what concerns you.

If you don’t talk to them about what bothers you, you will eventually talk to someone else. And then, in time, word will get back to those you’ve talked about and then it’s too late, because now it’s gossip. And here is the thing. You don’t gossip about people you love. Because you didn’t care enough about how they’d feel to talk to them directly and instead you talked about them behind their back – that’s sin. Gossip is always sin.

Proverbs 16:28 A dishonest man spreads strife, and a whisperer separates close friends.

Do me a favor, and I’ve said this before, because I don’t want to be a part of a back stabbing, rumor mill, gossip churning, critical church.

Do me a favor, when something or someone upsets you in church (or anywhere) you go and speak to them personally… nobody needs more drama in their life.

Ok we’ve had two poor relationship examples, now it’s time for one good one.

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